bktball
Vision 2020 » HHCA COVID UPDATE

HHCA COVID UPDATE

 
 
Vision 2020:
Hilton Head Christian Academy
COVID-19 Plan, Procedures & Updates
 
___________________________
 
 
Philosophy

 

The greatest question HHCA has to answer is how will we move forward in light of the reality of COVID-19. As we consider the moment we find ourselves in, we believe there are only two realistic options.

 

We all must realize that as life begins to get moving again, virus infections will continue to rise. This is a harsh reality, but one that statistically cannot be denied. Over the summer of 2019, schools had two options: (1) keep moving with safety guidelines to minimize the spread of COVID-19 or (2) revert back to “quarantine” and only offer online school.

 

Both options had significant positives and yet potentially greater negatives:

 

  • The positive of the return to quarantine was clearly the (hopeful) immediate health benefits of isolation. The negative was the overall impact on quality of life and interpersonal socialization.

  • The positive of moving forward with offering school in-person was the overall impact on quality of life and interpersonal socialization. The negative of this path was the (potential) health realities of contracting COVID-19.

For some, this was not a complicated decision to make. For those in an at-risk group, to pull back and continue in isolation was the obvious answer. The challenge game for those who are not at risk and seemingly move through the virus with very minimal complications.

 

HHCA chose to move forward confidently, with wisdom, being mindful of the physical, emotional and spiritual well being of each of our students. Our goal is always to protect the health and wellness of our HHCA community while also delivering an excellent education.

 

We believed then, and have seen since, that it was indeed possible, and important, to move forward this fall with excellence in both areas. You can find two articles that outline the importance of on-campus education HERE and HERE.

 

We continue to monitor health and wellness guidelines with flexibility and adjust plans as needed. Likewise, we continue to move forward with confidence in God’s plan and His provision as we walk down this path.

 

Is there absolute certainty of how everything will continue to unfold throughout the 2020-2021 school year? Absolutely not. However, there is complete confidence in the fact that God has a perfect plan as we enter the fall.

 

We prepared and have implemented a solid plan to safely host students, faculty, staff and volunteers on our campus. This document provides a roadmap of this plan, which was thoughtfully developed with information drawn from the best available science and public health guidance as well as the expertise of educators.

 

We continue to evolve and adapt these procedures over time, and will remain committed to providing the most responsible and safe environment possible.


Please carefully review each section below and reach out to us with any questions.
 

 

Partnering with our families as we navigate this unique season of life is not only an honor but also a key aspect of what will lead to overall success. While we will guide time on campus each day, we need your partnership while students are off campus.  We ask that you continue to encourage your child to follow the health and safety guidelines at HHCA and in the community. 

 

The reality is we can put the best of policies and procedures in place, but if our students are not following the guidelines while off campus, our measures will prove to be ineffective. Each family must decide what is right for their family. However, we ask that each family realize that their choices will have significant impacts on the overall HHCA community.  


May God grant us grace to partner well during this unprecedented time period.

 

We also ask that you DO NOT send your student to school if:

  •  Your student is experiencing any one (1) of the following
    • Fever (defined as a temperature of 100.0 or greater) - or - 
    • Fever (as defined above)  in the last 24 hours - or -
    • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing  - or -
    • Loss of taste or smell - or - 
    • New or worsening cough

  • Your student has any two (2) of the following:
    • Sore throat
    • Muscle or body aches
    • Chills
    • Fatigue
    • Headache
    • Congestion or runny nose
    • Diarrhea
    • Nausea or vomiting

NOTE: Any child with any one of these symptoms should consider not attending school regardless for meeting exclusion criteria above. If these symptoms are explainable by an underlying condition (such as shortness of breath or cough for an individual with asthma) exclusion may not be necessary,

  • Any member of the household has recently tested positive for COVID-19 (see Section 13, COVID-19 “Close Contact” Return to School Guidelines)

  • Your student has been tested for COVID-19 (for any reason) and is awaiting test results.

  • The student has been in "close contact" to a positive COVID-19 case.

    CDC defines "Close Contact" as: any individual who was within six feet of an infected person for at least fifteen minutes starting from two days before illness onset (or, for asymptomatic patients, two days prior to positive test date) until the time the patient is isolated.

  • Identified by DHEC through contact tracing as a “close contact” to a positive COVID-19 case.

 

The uncertainty of the last few months has only added to the ongoing struggle of uncertainty and insecurity that today's generation deals with each day.  At this critical moment in history it is absolutely essential that students are given a firm foundation to build their lives upon. The medical and cultural unrest and uncertainty are causing an already fragile foundation to be shaken to an even greater extent.

 

We argue that the greatest thing a parent can do for their child at this moment is invest in giving him/her a foundation of truth.

 

To be clear, Christian education is never meant to replace the family or the church. True Christian education is meant to be the third leg of the stool for each student to sit upon. As a school, now more than ever, we must give our students this foundation.

 

A true Christian education is built upon the following pillars:

 

Truth

 

Although smartphones and social media play a role in the current reality of America’s teenagers, they are certainly not the only contributors to their reality.  The world they are growing up in has eroded the idea of truth. Truth has become subjective to individual preference.  The greatest virtue of our current culture is tolerance.

 

Aristotle once said, “tolerance and apathy are the last virtues of a dying society.” 

 

At one point in time tolerance meant to put up with something although disagreeing with it.  Now, tolerance means to not only hear another person’s opinion, but to hold it as equal to your own.  The broken version of truth that students are growing up with today has led to an erosion of a coherent worldview. 

 

Martin Luther highlighted the difference between subjective and objective living in the poem below:

 

“Feelings come and feelings go,

And feelings are deceiving;

My warrant is the Word of God--

Naught else is worth believing.

 

Though all my heart should feel condemned

For want of some sweet token,

There is One greater than my heart

Whose Word cannot be broken.

 

I'll trust in God's unchanging Word

Till soul and body sever,

For, though all things shall pass away,

HIS WORD SHALL STAND FOREVER!”

 

When feelings become the defining explanation of truth, students are left in a very precarious position.  The very foundation they are attempting to build their life upon is shifting sand that is here today and gone tomorrow.  The truth of the Word of God (special revelation) and God’s creation (general revelation) are the foundation for everything else our school is built upon.  We cannot bend with cultural opinions and feelings.

 

Our students need to be given the tools to build their lives upon a foundation that is unchanging, that is the same yesterday, today and forever. They need a foundation that is not based on their feelings or preferences, rather on God’s unchanging character.

 

Worldview

 

Truth naturally leads to the formation of a student’s worldview, which is the lens through which they see the world and interpret the events that they encounter.

 

In an American culture that has eroded the idea of truth and made it dependent on how we feel about a given topic or situation, it is almost impossible to have a consistent worldview that makes sense. The real power behind a Christian education is the presentation of all of life through the lens of Scripture.

 

Martin Luther said, “I would advise no one to send their child where the Holy Scriptures are not supreme.” 

 

If we really want our children to understand the world and see the world as God sees the world we must educate them from a Christian perspective. We must show our students how God is as much at work in science classes as He is in athletic endeavors. 

 

Students need to have modeled a worldview that is consistent, unchanging and built upon something greater than themselves.  Today’s students are ill-prepared at best to answer the biggest questions in life (Where did I come from? Why am I here?  Where am I going?) in any coherent and consistent manner because our culture doesn’t offer a true answer.  A student will never understand their real identity if they cannot express where they came from and why they are here. 

 

Identity

 

This generation struggles with identity as much or more than any previous generation.  There is a true sense of adrift among teenagers. This is a major reason why anxiety is the number one health epidemic among teenagers in America today. Depression, cutting and suicide rates are at an all-time high. There is an absolute loss of self. A Christian education is the only education that can truly get to the heart of this issue.

 

There are not enough programs and motivational speakers that can solve the heart issue at stake. Nothing short of an understanding of the Gospel (brokenness and unconditional love) can give students a real sense of who they are and who God made them to be. We are commanded and given the privilege of speaking truth in love.

 

Students today need to understand the beauty of the grace of the Gospel and the importance and value of being made in the image of God. 

 

Tim Keller says that “our hearts are idol factories.”  We are constantly looking for our value in our performance, our possessions and our position in society.  If we haven’t learned anything else over the last few months, surely we have learned that all of these can be taken away in a moment. Real value is found in embracing the way God has created each individual and understanding that His love is unconditional. There is nothing we can do to make God love us more or love us less.  The freedom to be yourself in that type of love cannot be overstated.

 

Purpose

 

When students embrace how God has made them and recognize the unique ways He has gifted them, they can walk with confidence and purpose.

 

This generation wants to have an impact almost more than any other generation before them. They are a strange blend of selfish and charitable at the same time. Many explain this mix as a desire to find meaning and purpose.  Whatever the reason is for this desire, ultimately true purpose cannot be achieved without a full understanding of self.

 

A student has to understand how God has made them, how God loves them and how God has uniquely gifted them to impact the world around them. It is in that understanding that students are then equipped to see the bigger purpose for which God has created them. This can only be done through intentional personalized education that enables students to understand their identity that leads to a purpose bigger than themselves.

 

Hope

 

It is in finding that purpose, based on their firm understanding of identity, that students are then given true hope that will not disappoint. This generation has grown up with constant disappointment (broken families, failed policies, social and political unrest).  No doubt there is a void of true hope.

 

A Christian education shows students where true hope is found. Most secular education points to success as hope.  Although a partial truth, it is a painfully incomplete truth. True hope can only be found in the One who doesn’t change with the circumstances of life.  All people and circumstances will at some point let a person down, after all they were never meant to satisfy that deeper desire.  Students desperately need to be given a glimpse of a hope that transcends time and space.  The key to true hope is the word true.  Hope that is lasting must be built on truth that does not change—the promises and character of God. Education in which Biblical truth is not infused into each moment of each day is not true education.

 

At this unique moment in history, our students desperately need to be reminded of Biblical truth as they navigate each day.  Without these firm realities being embedded in each moment of instruction and interaction, students will be left to turn to the world for answers. The opportunity of Christian education is indeed vast and imperative at this moment in time.

 

You can find a complete video series HHCA released this spring entitled "Why A Christian Education Is More Important Today Than Ever" here. 

 

 

 

HHCA has assembled a dedicated Health and Safety Team in preparation for this fall. The team will continue to monitor medical updates and guide policies, protocols and planning. 

 

The Health and Safety Team includes:

 

Doug Langhals, Head of School

dlanghals@hhca.org 

 

Rachel Bagenstose, CFO/HR Director

rbagenstose@hhca.org 

 

Tabatha DeWitt, Director of Technology

tdewitt@hhca.org 

 

Parker Collins, Academic Dean

pcollins@hhca.org 

 

Steve Bryant, Director of Security

sbryant@hhca.org 

 

Jen Bowen, School Nurse

jbowen@hhca.org

 

New School Nurse

 

We are excited to welcome Jen Bowen to HHCA as our new school nurse.  Jen is a Registered Nurse and has 13 years of nursing experience in many settings, including most recently at M.C. Riley Elementary School in Bluffton, as well as hospital experience (labor and delivery) and public health. With her experience and education (a degree from the Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University), Jen will be a valued member of the HHCA team.  She will be on campus full-time each day.

 

New Isolation Area

 

We have added an isolation area in the back of the nurse’s office for any student who begins experiencing symptoms of COVID-19.  This will allow privacy and isolation for students exhibiting symptoms while parents are contacted. Upon notification by the school nurse that your student is experiencing symptoms, you are asked to pick up your student at the gate by the café. Students will be accompanied by an HHCA faculty or staff member to meet their parents at the gate.

 

 

 

At the time of publication (July 16, 2020) our plan is for all students K-12 to be on campus each day.  If the need for more flexibility arises, our schedule is designed to enable 8th-12th grade students to move into an A/B day on-campus schedule.

 

Physical Distance 

 

Close Contact” is defined by the CDC as being within six feet of an individual for 15 minutes.  In planning for the fall, we are creating as much physical distance as feasible within a school setting.  Class seating will be spread out in all rooms to enable students to interact and yet keep a healthy distance from each other.

 

Class Size and Schedule

 

To follow physical distance guidelines, class sizes will be minimized.  Each class will be monitored for size and spacing based on class location. The schedule will be focused on minimal movement within areas and more flexibility in which groups are moving at certain times. For schedule details see Section 8, Daily Schedules.  

 

Grade Locations

 

In order to minimize movement and maintain consistency of student contacts, Bible and core classes for each grade will be primarily contained in specific locations of the building. This will enable students to primarily stay with their grade for classes. This year will bring more movement of mentors from room to room rather than students. We are implementing use of our entire 13-acre campus and will encourage classes to be held outdoors when feasible.

 

Outdoor Spaces

 

We are creating a number of outdoor learning areas that will allow us to utilize expansive areas across our 13-acre campus. We will have large tents outside of the Lower School, 400 building and near the football field. This will allow more space and healthy movement for classes throughout the day. Weather is a consideration and will dictate daily usage, but advance mentor planning will coordinate utilization.

 

Face Coverings

 

All students in grades 5-12, faculty, staff and visitors will be expected to wear masks or face coverings while inside HHCA buildings. Students in K-4 will be expected to wear masks during certain times of the day such as when transitioning locations or when physical distancing is not possible and at the discretion of each HHCA Mentors. HHCA will provide all students and employees with one cloth buff, (additional buffs will be available). Mentors will have a supply of face coverings as well in the event a student does not have one when they are required.

 

The following list (although not exhaustive) are areas where wearing masks will not be required (physical spacing will be expected):

  • all outdoor areas, including outdoor classrooms
  • physical education classes
  • while eating
  • weight lifting classes
  • chorus and band classes (while playing instruments or singing—will often take place in outdoor settings)
  • in offices when alone 

Lockers and Gathering Areas; Textbooks and Laptops

 

We will be eliminating the use of lockers and other gathering areas this year.  Middle and Upper School students will receive a computer (see details in Section IX,  Online Learning Enhancements) and textbooks will be classroom sets that are kept in the rooms at all times.  Each student will have an individual book and resources to use daily.  Students will keep their backpack and all necessary items with them throughout the day. 

 

Hygiene Practices

 

Hand Sanitizing Stations

Contactless hand sanitizing stations will be available around the campus so students will be able to continuously clean their hands throughout the day. In addition, each classroom will have an ample supply of hand sanitizer and mentors will encourage use throughout the day.

 

Cleaning Machines and Supplies

Daily cleaning of the campus will take place throughout the day and between days (see Section V.  Daily Cleaning and Sanitizing). We have purchased several disinfecting machines that have been proven to be more effective than typical cleaning measures.

 

One-Way Stairwells and Campus Signage

All hallways will have minimized movement based on grade room locations.  The main stairwell by the café/gymnasium will be one-way going up and the back stairwell by Room 306 will be one-way going down.  Health and safety signage with reminders about face coverings, hand washing, and physical distancing will be clearly displayed throughout the campus.

 

Daily Health Screenings

 

We ask that each family screen their child with the following criteria prior to attending school. 

 

We also ask that you DO NOT send your student to school if:

 

  •  Your student is experiencing any one (1) of the following
    • Fever (defined as a temperature of 100.0 or greater) - or - 
    • Fever (as defined above)  in the last 24 hours - or -
    • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing  - or -
    • Loss of taste or smell - or - 
    • New or worsening cough

  • Your student has any two (2) of the following:
    • Sore throat
    • Muscle or body aches
    • Chills
    • Fatigue
    • Headache
    • Congestion or runny nose
    • Diarrhea
    • Nausea or vomiting

NOTE: Any child with any one of these symptoms should consider not attending school regardless for meeting exclusion criteria above. If these symptoms are explainable by an underlying condition (such as shortness of breath or cough for an individual with asthma) exclusion may not be necessary,

  • Any member of the household has recently tested positive for COVID-19 (see Section 13, COVID-19 “Close Contact” Return to School Guidelines)

  • Your student has been tested for COVID-19 (for any reason) and is awaiting test results.

  • The student has been in "close contact" to a positive COVID-19 case.

    CDC defines "Close Contact" as: any individual who was within six feet of an infected person for at least fifteen minutes starting from two days before illness onset (or, for asymptomatic patients, two days prior to positive test date) until the time the patient is isolated.

  • Identified by DHEC through contact tracing as a “close contact” to a positive COVID-19 case.

 

Daily Student Entry and Exit Procedures

 

K-7th grade students will be directed to enter through the side doors that lead to the Lower School (rather than through the main lobby).  Lower School students should proceed directly to their learning suite. 8th-12th grade students will enter through the gate next to the café.  All Middle and Upper School students should report directly to their first-period class. The front office/lobby area should remain free of student movement prior to the beginning of the school day.  Students are asked not to enter buildings until 7:30 AM.  Drop-off will remain the same as in previous years.  At drop-off and pick-up, students will be directed to their appropriate entry and exit points. Lower School dismissal will begin at 2:40 PM. Middle School students will be dismissed at 2:55 PM and Upper School students at 3:00 PM.

 

Campus Hours 

 

Students will need to depart from campus upon dismissal unless they are participating in or watching after-school activities and athletics. PLEASE NOTE: In order to allow our faculty and staff to properly clean and prepare campus for the following school day, HHCA will not be able to offer After Class Enrichment (ACE, our after school program) this year.

 

Faculty/Staff Training

 

All faculty and staff will be thoroughly trained on HHCA’s COVID-19 philosophy, policies, and overall reopening plan.  For the health and safety of all faculty/staff and students, all policies will be clearly articulated, strictly enforced, and modeled by HHCA employees.

 

 

The following measures are general guidelines, including information from both the EPA and CDC, that will help ensure the health and safety of students, mentors, administrators, and staff. These apply to the buildings on campus, athletic facilities, outdoor areas including outdoor classrooms and busses. Implementation of these procedures will be guided and/or altered by what is feasible, practical, acceptable, and tailored to the direct needs of the school based on current best practices and recommendations.

 

Cleaning refers to the removal of germs, dirt, and impurities from surfaces. It does not kill germs, but by removing them, it lowers their numbers and the risk of spreading infection.

 

Disinfecting refers to using chemicals, for example, EPA-registered disinfectants, to kill germs on surfaces. This process does not necessarily clean dirty surfaces or remove germs, but by killing germs on a surface after cleaning, it can further lower the risk of spreading infection.

 

High-touch surfaces include desks, tables, doorknobs, door crash bars, weight room equipment and some athletic equipment or training aids, light switches, countertops, handles, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.

 

General Buildings, Classrooms, Cafeteria

 

Facility staff will wear disposable gloves to clean and disinfect.  Surfaces will be cleaned with an approved cleaning agent, and then disinfected with a hospital grade or EPA/CDC recommended agent.  All commonly touched or used surfaces will be cleaned and disinfected at the start and end of each school day.  Routine and systematic cleaning and disinfecting will take place throughout the day with special attention given to those surfaces that are in high-activity areas or considered high-touch surfaces.  The buildings will be more deeply cleaned every evening by a professional cleaning service, using hospital grade disinfectants and cleaning agents.

 

Athletic Facilities/Weight Room

 

Weight rooms and exercise equipment will fall under high-touch surfaces and will be cleaned and disinfected after each use/person.  All equipment will be wiped down and disinfected immediately after each use, and before the next use.

 

Outdoor Areas

 

Playgrounds in schools generally require normal routine cleaning, but do not require disinfection.  High-touch surfaces made of plastic or metal, such as grab bars and railings will be cleaned routinely.  Cleaning and disinfection of wooden surfaces (play structures, benches, tables) or ground covers (mulch, sand) is not recommended.

 

Busses/Transportation

 

Cleaning and disinfecting of the busses will take place each morning and after each bus trip.  High-touch surfaces as well as seating and seat backs will be wiped down and disinfected before and after each trip or pick-up/drop-off of students.

 

 

 

The COVID-19 pandemic presents all schools with a myriad of challenges in regards to athletics, fine arts and other extracurricular activities. HHCA believes it is essential to the physical and mental well-being of our students to be given opportunities for learning beyond the walls of the classroom.

To ensure the safest possible reopening of these types of activities, HHCA will rely on South Carolina Independent Schools Association (SCISA) and CDC guidelines. 

 

  • All student athletes must adhere to SCISA rules and complete proper inherent risk forms prior to participation.

  • Additional protocols and procedures will be forthcoming. Contact Kenny Conroy, Athletic Director or Travis Priddy, Middle School Athletic Director, with questions about athletics. Contact James Berry, Fine Arts Director, with questions about fine arts.

  • Continuous health monitoring such as temperature checks and ensuring proper hygiene requirements prior to practices, performances, workouts and competitions will be conducted.

  • Continuous disinfecting of all practice, performance and competition areas, equipment, and transportation vehicles will take place.

  • Locker rooms will remain closed until further notice. Students will report to workouts and practices in proper gear per SCISA guidelines.

  • Transportation to and from events may look different this year.  HHCA will maintain physical distancing for bus transportation as required by state and/or local health departments. This could mean parents would have to provide transportation to athletic events when needed.

  • All decisions regarding these activities will be based on the governing bodies’ edicts. This includes audience or crowd attendance.

  • Fine Arts and P.E. classes will use a combination of both indoor and outdoor spaces to enable instruments, singing and activity, and movement in a healthy manner.

  • Fine Arts will be rolling out a new 2020-2021 schedule that will enable students to grow in their passion for the arts and also follow all safety and health guidelines.
 

 

Events

 

We will continue to monitor all health and safety guidelines as we determine the crowd size and spacing for events such as fine arts performances, athletic competitions, school assemblies, retreats and chapels.  We will continue to communicate details as we near each event.  Field trips and class trips will be determined on a case-by-case basis and review of the best health information available at that time.

 

 

Bus Guidelines

 

The following guidelines will be applied to all bus transportation provided by HHCA throughout the school year.

 

  • Students will be seated one per seat, unless they have a sibling on the bus.  In the case of siblings, we will seat them together, but no more than 2 per seat.

  • Face coverings are required during the entire bus ride.

  • Students will be required to sanitize hands upon boarding and disembarking from the bus.

  • Weather-permitting, windows will be down to allow for air movement.

  • Busses will be cleaned and disinfected after each bus trip.

  • Parents will be required to sign an additional waiver acknowledging the inherent risks associated with students riding the HHCA bus.

 

 

Lower School

 

The Lower School schedule will be structured by grade and location. Recess will be broken down by grade.

 

 

Middle School

 

The Middle School schedule is very similar to last year's schedule with seven class periods as listed below. Chapel will be held on Thursdays, with E-10 group time and Bible class every day.

 

8:00-8:50 AM | First Period

8:55-9:45 AM | Second Period (Chapel on Thursdays)

9:50-10:00 AM | E-10 Group Time

 

10:05-10:55 AM | Third Period (Bible)

 

11:00-11:50 AM | Fourth Period

 

11:50 AM-12:20 PM | Lunch

 

12:20-1:10 PM | Fifth Period

 

1:15-2:05 PM | Sixth Period

 

2:10-2:55 PM | Seventh Period

 

2:55 PM | Dismissal

 

 

Upper School

 

Prior to COVID-19, our academic team was already planning to transition to a new schedule model for the coming school year. You will find the schedule grid below. This new schedule translates well with new guidelines and procedures we will have in place due to the pandemic.

 

The new model is beneficial in a number of ways as it relates to advancing our academic vision. The varied class times allow multiple teaching methods to be utilized. It also facilitates more small group and individual learning opportunities, promotes student-led learning passions, and assists with the concurrence of on-campus and online learning.  

 

Notes:

  • Class transitions are not reflected in the grid below. Class start times will direct class transitions, allowing mentors and students to properly implement end-of-class procedures based on the needs of each class.

  • 20 minutes are designated for lunch. There will be flexibility, if needed, based on lunch distribution abilities to give a few more minutes on the end of the lunch period.

  • On Wednesday's, 8:00-8:35 AM is designated for office hours. Students will be in their first period class area, but have the opportunity to connect with mentors and peers to work on projects or receive additional help as needed.
 
us

 

Dismissal Times

 

Lower School 2:40 PM | Middle School 2:55 PM | Upper School 3:00 PM

 

 
 
  • Lunch will be served via to-go containers with disposable utensils instead of buffet service.

  • Online pre-orders will be required for students getting lunch at school to minimize cash handling.

  • Lower School will break lunch groups into K-2 and 3-5 to allow for proper spacing.

  • Middle and Upper School lunches will be spread out throughout the campus, utilizing outdoor spaces when available or in classrooms if necessary.
 
 

 

As we navigated the spring of an overnight online switch there were three critical lessons that we learned and have addressed moving into the fall.  By addressing each of these key areas HHCA will be trained to move from an on-campus to an online platform overnight if health reasons warranted such a move (for an individual student or for an entire school shift). 

 

These lessons will also enable us to run a dual model that allows for simultaneous on campus and online education:


Learner Management System

 

In the spring we tried out numerous platforms.  The lesson learned is that we must commit to one platform as a school.  As we move into the fall, MyHHCA will be used for grading and big picture communication.  We will integrate Google Classroom for all assignments and daily details.  


Technology

 

In the spring we were not on a one to one platform and that provided numerous challenges for our families and faculty.  This summer we have invested in Dell 2 in 1 Latitude laptops for all 7th-12th grade students and will be utilizing our Apple products for all K-6th grade students.  We have also hired a full time Technology Director, Tabitha Dewitt, to lead all implementation.


Daily Schedule

 

In the spring we created a modified schedule to move to an online platform. This schedule proved to be highly effective in certain areas and less effective in other areas. We have worked on creating a schedule that can translate to online learning overnight.  It will be possible to  live-stream or record classes to enable HHCA Online students and any other student who is absent the ability to keep up with classes each day.

 

 

In June we announced a virtual option ("HHCA Online") for families who do not wish  to move their students back on campus this fall. This option will enable students to maintain a strong connection to HHCA.  HHCA Online offers a team of individuals dedicated to partnering with families and classroom mentors to ensure the best possible experience while students are working from home.  Participants will work through Google Classroom and a blend of recorded and live-stream classes.

 

The HHCA Online Team:

 

Parker Collins, Academic Dean

pcollins@hhca.org 

 

Lynn Thurlow, HHCA Online Director

pcollins@hhca.org 

 

Caitlyn Lankowski, Online Learning Coordinator

clankowski@hhca.org

Ashley Beebe, Family Liaison

abeebe@hhca.org 

 

We recognize that this option only provides a portion of the HHCA experience and have adjusted the tuition rate accordingly (Lower School $8,000; Middle School $10,000; Upper School $12,000).

 

For the 2020-2021 school year, this same tuition model would be prorated to all HHCA families in the event we were forced to move the entire school off campus for an extended period of time due to COVID-19.


Another reality that we are preparing for as we move into the fall is attendance challenges. The new health guidelines may force students and faculty to have prolonged absences off campus if they are impacted by COVID-19. 

 

Students who are absent will be able to keep up with their daily classes just as any other student who is a part of HHCA Online through Google Classroom and a blend of recorded and live-stream classes.


We will not be following our traditional attendance policies for exam exemptions and grade reduction for students in grades 8-12.


Please note that should there by any cause for postponing on-campus instruction (hurricane disaster, COVID-19, etc.), our online instruction platform will be activated for all students.

 

Below is a video with FAQs about the HHCA Online program. Please apply by July 24, 2020.

 

Email questions@hhca.org to apply or for more information.

 

 

 

In the event a student tests positive for COVID-19, the following steps will be followed by the HHCA Health and Safety Team:

 

1) The school will be notified either by the parent or DHEC of the positive COVID-19 case. Upon being notified, the school nurse will confirm details with the family and ensure the protocol described herein has been properly communicated. 

 

2) The School Nurse will update the number of positive COVID-19 cases on the school website. In addition, she will notify the parents of students who were in classes, on a sports team, or on a bus route with the individual who tested positive during their infectious period. Due to HIPPA regulations, no identifying information of the student who tested positive will be shared with the school community. DHEC will then follow up regarding procedures for specific contact tracing. Anyone who has been in "close contact" (as defined by CDC) with the individual who tested positive should follow "close contact" protocol in Section 13, Category 2.

3) The school, in partnership with families, will continue to monitor and perform  symptom screenings of all class members. The members of the classes from which the positive test result came will remain together and be closely monitored for any symptoms and revert to policies under our COVID-19 “Close Contact” Return to School Guidelines.

  • Those who are a "close contact" should follow "close contact" protocol in Section 13, Category 2.

    CDC defines "Close Contact" as: any individual who was within six feet of an infected person for at least fifteen minutes starting from two days before illness onset (or, for asymptomatic patients, two days prior to positive test date) until the time the patient is isolated.

  • Those not determined to be “Close Contact” should continue daily screenings for symptoms.

 

The following guidelines will be followed when a student has a positive COVID-19 test or is possibly in close contact with a person with a positive test.

 

Category 1: Those who have been diagnosed with COVID-19

 

Anyone (employee, student, parent or visitor) who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and is SYMPTOMATIC should stay in home isolation:

 

  • A minimum of 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared AND at least 24 hours have passed without fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and improvement in respiratory symptoms

  • 24 hours can be included in the 10 days

  • Parent and student have submitted the Parent/Student Confirmation for Return To Campus form

Anyone (employee, student, parent or visitor) who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and is ASYMPTOMATIC should stay home until:

  • A minimum of 10 days have passed since testing assuming they have not subsequently developed symptoms since their positive test

  • If symptoms develop the individual should stay home a minimum of 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared, and at least 24 hours have passed without fever without the use of fever reducing medications, and improvement in respiratory symptoms

  • Parent and student have submitted the Parent/Student Confirmation for Return To Campus form

 

Category 2: Those who have been in “Close Contact” with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19.

CDC defines "Close Contact" as: any individual who was within six feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes starting from two days before illness onset (or, for asymptomatic patients, two days prior to positive test date) until the time the patient is isolated.

 

Anyone (employee, student, parent or visitor) who has been in “Close Contact” should stay home and quarantine until:

 

  • A minimum of 14 days have passed after last exposure to positive case.

  • Regardless of negative test results, the 14 day quarantine must be followed.

 

Category 3: Those living in the same house as someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 but can avoid further close contact with the individual who has tested positive.

 

Anyone (employee, student, parent or visitor) who lives with someone who has tested positive (whether asymptomatic or symptomatic) should remain home until:

  • A minimum of 14 days have passed since COVID-19 positive individual started home isolation.

  • You will need to restart your 14 day quarantine period if: (1) you have close contact again with the COVID-19 positive individual and/or (2) another member of the household tests positive.

  • If you develop symptoms or tests positive—refer to Category 1 or 2.

 

Category 4: Those living in the same house as someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 but cannot avoid further close contact with the individual who has tested positive.


  • A minimum of 14 days have passed since COVID-19 positive individual ended their 10 day home isolation.

 

Category 5: Those with NO “Close Contact” exposure who test negative for COVID-19

 

Anyone who tests negative for Covid-19 and has not been in “Close Contact” may return to campus.

 
crest
 
HHCA FAMILIES:
updates regarding
COVID-19.

________________
 
QUESTIONS
Please feel free
to reach out
to any of the
following
school
leaders:
 
School Nurse
 
Director of Security
 
Head of School
 
Phone:
(843) 681-2878
 
________________